Don’t forget to register for next month’s Trimble MEP user conference

Don’t forget to register for next month’s Trimble MEP user conference

Join hundreds of industry leaders from around the world for 2.5 days and over 100 informative sessions, technical training, labs, demos and support one-on-one sessions. From this exciting event, you will be equipped with the knowledge you need to overcome challenges faced in today’s competitive MEP business environment.

Learn More About The Converge MEP Conference
August 16th, 2017|BuildBlog|

Trimble RPT: One Button, One Complete Solution

Trimble RPT: One Button, One Complete Solution

Construction layout is a concept that involves a number of different applications and specific tasks. With the Trimble RPT, contractors have a rugged, jobsite-ready positioning solution that has been built and engineered specifically for building construction, at a price point that significantly lowers the investment required to leverage positioning technology.

The Trimble RPT600 is the result of a complete rethinking of the layout requirements for structural and interior trades, specifically drywall and cast-in-place concrete. Focusing on these particular applications, Trimble set out to create a positioning solution that is at home within these applications. As designs continue to gain complexity, and schedules continue to compress, the Trimble RPT600 provides a powerful, yet familiar workflow that makes sense to both seasoned and less experienced layout teams alike.

With the RPT600, design complexity is made irrelevant. Simply set up the instrument using the automated one-button setup, select your first point within Trimble Field Link, and you’re ready to start laying out points. Boasting Trimble Vision, layout can be achieved using either a traditional layout rod, or when conditions permit, users can even use a high visibility green beam for visual layout directly on the surface.

Precision layout couldn’t be easier. All it takes is one button.

Learn More About The Trimble RPT
August 14th, 2017|BuildBlog|

Upcoming Webinar: Workforce Management – More than just who’s here

Upcoming Webinar: Workforce Management – More than just who’s here

In this webinar, Trimble takes a deep-dive into workforce mangement via Trimble Crewsight. Crewsight is a workforce management solution to help you to better manage your workforce and contribute to a more successful and profitable project outcome. In addition to showing you how to gain better transparency to workers on your project, we’ll show you how you can use Trimble CrewSight to ensure compliance requirements, improve safety, and create a more effective working relationship with key stakeholders on the project. This in-depth webinar will be held on Tuesday, August 15th at 12PM. To register for the webinar, click the link below.

Click Here To Register For The Webinar
August 11th, 2017|BuildBlog|

Trimble Field Points 5.0 Is Now Available

Trimble Field Points 5.0 Is Now Available

Trimble has just released Trimble Field Points5.0. This annual compatibility release features support for Autodesk® AutoCAD® 2018 and Autodesk® Revit® 2018.

To learn more about Trimble Field Points, and the new v5.0 capabilities, head over to Trimble’s product page, download the release notes below, or contact your BuildingPoint representative directly.

View The Trimble Field Points 5.0 Release Notes
August 9th, 2017|BuildBlog|

WinEst Webinar Series: Database Editing

WinEst Webinar Series: Database Editing

In this webinar, Trimble takes a deep-dive into Trimble WinEst database editing. This one hour webinar is part of Trimble’s monthly online educational series designed to help users unlock the power of Trimble WinEst. This month’s webinar will be held on Thursday, August 10h at 1PM. To register for the webinar, click the link below.

Click Here To Register For The Webinar
August 7th, 2017|BuildBlog|

Foundations Episode #20 – Scaling Scanning

Foundations Episode #20 – Scaling Scanning

Scanning has become an important part of the DBO process, and construction companies large and small are using this powerful technology on projects of all sizes. In this episode of Foundations, we’re joined by Tim Malys from DPR Construction, to discuss how they’ve been using scanning for their projects.

August 4th, 2017|BuildBlog, Foundations|

Register for next month’s Trimble MEP user conference

Register For Next Month’s Trimble MEP User Conference

Join hundreds of industry leaders from around the world for 2.5 days and over 100 informative sessions, technical training, labs, demos and support one-on-one sessions. From this exciting event, you will be equipped with the knowledge you need to overcome challenges faced in today’s competitive MEP business environment.

Learn More About The Converge MEP Conference
August 2nd, 2017|BuildBlog|

One Stop Cost Estimating

One Stop Cost Estimating

Today, there are two different paths for construction cost estimating. You have the option of utilizing either 2D plans, or 3D models. The decision as to which method will be chosen for the pre-construction and estimating phase traditionally rests upon two factors. The requirements of the bid and the constraints placed by the owner, and the overall familiarity and comfort with detailed (or not-so-detailed) BIM models. This is a reasonable criteria. Construction companies have a tried and true 2D estimation process based upon years of experience, best practice, and real-world historical actuals. This data set consistently provides the most comprehensive and reliable estimation baseline, while 3D models typically provide a greater level of detail and quantity information.

So the question remains… Why don’t we combine the two? Trimble has answered this question with GC Estimator. Now, we can. With GC Estimator, you can seamlessly integrate custom assemblies and actual quantity pricing with 3D models and quantities, giving you a hybrid solution that is head and shoulders above the estimate provide by standalone 2D or 3D data.

To learn more about GC Estimator, or to view an in-depth demo, simply click the link below.

Learn More About Trimble GCEstimator
July 31st, 2017|BuildBlog|

How Much Accuracy Is Enough?

How Much Accuracy Is Enough?

Following up on the blog post from earlier this week, we’re revisiting the concept and the idea of accuracy on a construction project. Every job is different. And a variety of different inputs and constraints dictate the tolerances for a particular scope within a particular project. The possibilities are endless. But often times, users get caught up looking at the accuracy of a particular instrument, total station, or scanning solution and see that as a gating item for job site integration. Without a doubt, some projects have very tight tolerances. Understanding the capabilities and limitations at the solutions in your toolkit can go a long way towards ensuring that project accuracy goals and tolerances are met. In this post, let’s take an (admittedly) brief look at the concept of angle accuracy, specifically when it comes to robotic total stations.

The accuracy of an optical instrument is represented as something called “angular accuracy”. This means how small of an angle the instrument can measure. This accuracy is measured in “seconds”, or arc seconds. In radial measurements, we assume that there are 360 degrees in a circle. Taken a step further, you can divide each degree into 60 equal parts, or “minutes”. Taken one step further, you can divide these minutes into 60 equal parts or “seconds”.

Given that optical instruments (typically mechanical and robotic total stations) are categorized based on their angular accuracy, which we measure in arc seconds. We are defining the differences in 1/3600th of a degree increments. That’s a very, very tight tolerance. Most commercially viable total stations provide measurements with 1, 3, or 5 second accuracy. That’s 1/3600, 1/1200, or 1/720 of a degree, respectively. How does this look in the real-world? Let’s take a look.

First, let’s take a look at 200’. In most vertical buildings, this is a fairly long run from a station. In this scenario, the tolerance for 1, 3, and 5 second accuracies would be:

< 1/64” for a 1 second instrument
< 3/64” for a 3 second instrument
< 1/16” for a 5 second instrument

Now, let’s move closer. At 100’ from the instrument, the tolerance increases to:

< 1/128” for a 1 second instrument
< 3/128” for a 3 second instrument
< 1/32” for a 5 second instrument

And finally, let’s move closer, to 50’ from the station. Given the realities of construction, 50’ is the baseline average because of obstacles, equipment, and structural elements that block line of sight.

< 1/256” for a 1 second instrument
< 3/256” for a 3 second instrument
< 1/64” for a 5 second instrument

As we can see from these calculations, the angular accuracy of the optical instrument does not significantly impact the measurement accuracy and tolerance a specific point. Now, as distance increases, it most certainly begins to impact accuracy, in a logarithmic fashion. So for significantly long runs, or for very long control runs, it does impact accuracy. But within a building project, the optical instrument is typically well within the margin of error when it comes to accuracy and tolerance.

By understanding angular accuracy, you can begin to tailor your technology and equipment to match the requirements of your project. Saving both time and effort.

July 27th, 2017|BuildBlog|

Connect & Go : Quick And Easy Layout With GNSS

Connect & Go : Quick And Easy Layout With GNSS

We often talk about Building Construction in the tightest tolerances possible. In most cases, the more accurate the better. With robotic total stations, the XYZ tolerance can be 1/16”, or .0625” for those of us in the decimal system. And while there is certainly something to be said for amazing accuracy… sometimes it doesn’t have to be that tight. To reach that level of accuracy on a layout project, robotic total stations must utilize on-site control to reference the total station’s position and orientation on the project. But what if no on-site control exists? Or, what if that control is suspect to begin with? Enter satellite-based solutions, such as the Trimble R8s.

With a networked solution such as the Trimble R8s, you can simply pull the receiver out of the case, dial into the Trimble VRSNow network, and begin laying out and checking points and control locations. To be sure, the level of accuracy is not identical to a robotic total station solution, but in most cases you can achieve real-time accuracy of less than 1”. This tolerance is more than acceptable for checking forms, building edges, site boundaries, and a myriad of other early production tasks.

To learn more about the Trimble R8s, you can simply click the link below.

Learn More About The Trimble R8s GNSS Receiver
July 25th, 2017|BuildBlog|
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